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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 199 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >>> after weeks of controversy, resignation and arrests, britain's "news of the world" published its last issue yesterday, sunday. the final issue of the british tabloid reading, thank you and good-bye. it comes as explosive new allegations come to light about the phone-hacking scandal surrounding the paper. the rival "the mirror" reports today a new york city reports "news of the world" asked for voice mail of 9/11 victims. the report says the tabloid wanted phone numbers and details of calls leading up to the terror attacks almost a decade ago. nbc's anabel reports on the demise. >> reporter: rupert murdoch arrived in london to oversee the crisis threatening his media empire in britain. on the road to his headquarters he enjoyed one last read of the newspaper he closed down last week. "thank you and good-bye" screamed the front page. it was britain's biggest selling paper with an unbeaten record for exposing corruption but the tables have turned and it is now being investigated following allegations of police bribery and widespread hacking of personal voice mails. few of the current sta
that because britain and germany were both anglo-saxon races, that they as aryans would not go to war with one another. it's an absurdity, needless to say, on so many levels. he, himself, had served in the trenches in the great war when they helped one another. but nonetheless, by the time the second world war broke out, there were only 46 operational u-boats against the united kingdom because he didn't believe he would ever have to actually fight the united kingdom. by the end of the war there were 463, most of them bottled up in the atlantic. but if he had started with as many as he finished with, he would have been able to strangle the united king kingdom. and when one looks at the plans to invade the united kingdom, many of which weren't agreed up until september 1940 when really they ought to have been put in place as soon as he came to power in january 1933, one appreciates how little he was expected to have to attack. there is the infamous list of 2,820 brick britons who were going to be shot on sight or at least when they were arrested by is the ss when the germans successfully invaded
on. >> default, get it over with. >> we came up celebrating great britain. but next, a new book at how britain played a crucial role in the american civil war. stay with us. we'll have that with more "morning joe." ♪♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ look at that car, well, it goes fast ♪ ♪ givin' my dad a heart attack ♪ [ friend ] that is so awesome. ♪ i love my car [ engine revving ] [ male announcer ] that first chevy, yea, it gets under your skin. ♪ >>> 40 past the hour. welcome back to "morning joe." joining us, award-winning historian and internationally best-selling author, amanda foreman. she's out now with a new book, "a world on fire." britain's crucial role in the american civil war. i love the back story. what a woman. today's woman. it took her ten years to write this book? >> ten years. she had five kids along the way. >> that's busy. >> that's impressive. >> to say the least. >> got in the book a tad bit. >> tell us about the book that has an amazing cast of characters. >> 197 characters, mostly men. system of the women are so great that they stand out. my favorite is th
for questioning and found herself under arrest. hours later, britain's top police officer, the chief of scotland yard resigned, and he acknowledges that the investigation was inadequate, and steven yates now announcing his resignation. the scandal has been growing steadily after reports that there was a hacking of an answering machine by "news of the world." tomorrow murdoch and his son james are scheduled to appear on a hearing in parliament. cnn will bring you that testimony live. dan rivers is inla london. rebekah brooks is expected to testify tomorrow, and now what are the plans in terms of questioning her tomorrow? >> reporter: well, politicians will have to be careful how they frame the questions to her. in britain, if there is a pending trial or the possibility of a pending trial, you have to be very careful what kind of news coverage is gained from that, because they don't want to prejudge the trial here. they don't want to sway a potential juror one way or the other. and this testimony from rebekah brooks will be broadcast live not only here but around the world. they have to be fairly
and that it is the achievements of the two countries. >> we can be proud of what this statue says about britain and america. it reminds us of a period of extraordinary achievement and hope in world affairs after a time of darkness and danger. it celebrates the life of an exceptional and gifted american president. it's a fitting tribute to one of the truest friends that britain has ever had. >> reporter: former british prime minister margaret thatcher, a close friend of reagan's, was invited to the event but was too frail to attend. the statue was commissioned by the reagan memorial fund trust and joins here in griefnor park of former presidents roosevelt and eisenhower. >>> back here at home, thousands are celebrating independence day with the nation's first president. and holly morris is caught up with general year washington earlier at his mount vernon, state. >> if you can talk to one person, who would it be? many people say the first president. general george washington and as luck would have it on this july 4th, i knew where i could find him. greetings, general washington. >> madame, welcome to mount
been a public savings announcement. out there with a better way. now, that's progressive. >>> britain's "daily mirror" reports that journalists of "news of the world" unsuccessfully try ied to hack into 9/11 victims' phones. >>> cruise ship went down. at least 80 people have been rescued but about 100 more are still missing. >>> the u.s. is withholding $800 million in aid to pakistan. top u.s. officials say it's meant to pressure pakistan to crack down on militants. >>> now there's new evidence of just how strained the relations are between the u.s. and one of its most critical allies in the fight against terror. today, a defiant pakistan is shrugging off the white house decision to withhold $800 million in aid for that country's military. chris lawrence at the pentagon. we should talk about what all the money goes toward. it's sort of understandable when you think this is the country where they found osama bin laden. you wonder why the u.s. is giving so much money to its military. >> that's right. and, really, this is part of the whole fallout from the whole osama bin laden operation
of britain. the newspaper that tapped into the voice mail of the widows of former soldiers and other victims. it's going to close tomorrow. a key aide to the british prime minister is arrested in relation to the investigation. >>> we have the story of one lucky kitten. it was thrown out of a car in the verazano bridge here in new york. a driver who saw the whole thing was able to rescue the little guy. that hero driver is in the studio. so is that little kitten that he saved. wow is he cute? >> you love the outcome. but the horrible thought of someone tossing a cat out the window. we want to begin with the death of betty ford, the former first lady helped sparked some important conversations in this country. died in california on friday, she was 93. in a statement president obama called for a powerful advocate for womens rights. because of ford's leadership, many lives were saved. brian williams looks back on her life. >>> we got to know her all over again during the week of mourning for president gerald ford, her strength and dignity still intact 30 years after leaving the white house. >> i
the prime minister of britain, of the uk, all the way to south africa where he is on a trip to try to drum the more business. the head of britain's largest police force has resigned. that's sir paul stevenson. commissioner of the metropolitan police stepped down as questions surrounding his relationship with editors of the "news of the world" newspaper. while stevenson maintains he had no knowledge of the extent of the activities paper he said he was resigning because "as commissioner i carry ultimate responsibility for the position we find ourselves in." his resignation comes as news international's former chief executive rebekah brooks was arrested sunday and underwent 12 hours of questioning by police. that came as a surprise she was arrested. she thought she was just going to be helping in their investigation. brooks is set to appear before a parliamentary inquiry tuesday alongside james murdock and rupert murdock. there are questions if she'll be able to testify. >> those bombings last week in india. hillary clinton had a trip planned there. she's still going ahead with that trip? >>
they call in britain, the gutter press. dan rivers, cnn, london. >> it's not clear what if anything rupert murdoch will say when he sits before parliament at 9:30 a.m. eastern time. >> his media empire hangs in the balance many people say as does his career as news corp ceo. it leads to the question of the day and question that's central to today's hearing, do you think that rupert murdoch knew about the phone hacking? >> on facebook, benny says he owns several corporations in different countries. t there's no way he can be involved in day-to-day operation of any of them. >> peter says on our blog, don't know if he did or not. the issue should be why he created a work culture that allowed this to happen. news corp needs to be held accountable and that includes the top officers of the organization. >> and on facebook, if he knew what his company was doing, shame on him. if he didn't know, double shame on him. a lot of different comments this morning. keep them coming. >> send us an e-mail or tweet or contact us on facebook. >> phone hacking hearing just five minutes away. we'll have live co
come-from-behind victory over brazil. the final is set for sunday. >>> britain's hacking scandal forces rupert murdoch to make a stunning move. and rushes relief to the site of pain. it's clinically proven to relieve pain twice as fast. new bayer advanced aspirin. there's another way to minimize litter box odor: purina tidy cats. our premium litters now work harder to help neutralize odors in multiple cat homes. purina tidy cats. keep your home smelling like home. vietnam, 1967. i got mine in iraq, 2003. u.s.a.a. auto insurance is often handed down from generation to generation, because it offers a superior level of protection and because u.s.a.a.'s commitment to serve the military, veterans, and their families is without equal. begin your legacy. get an auto insurance quote. u.s.a.a. we know what it means to serve. personal pricing now on brakes. tell us what you want to pay. we do our best to make that work. deal! my money. my choice. my meineke. >>> under pressure by the british parliament, murdoch's news corp. announced today they will drop the bid for taking bs bs bs bskyb. let's g
is more of what we've heard from the judicial inquiry and a new relationship, certainly in britain between the press and politicians whereby meetings will still go on, but now everything will be open, above board and logged every time. which i think is a reform very much overdue. >> do you have suspicions about the prime minister david cameron that he may have known more than he's acknowledging? >> none whatsoever. and even among the most rabid labor parties i haven't heard anything about the prime minister's integrity. people talk about the judgment in hiring andy coulson, but hiebd sight is absolutely perfe perfect. and many in the press at the time thought it was an inspired appointment. also, mr. coulson's guilt hasn't been proven so far either. so no, the prime minister his integrity isn't called into any kind of question. when he announced a very strong statement tomorrow and his mps backing him. indeed we've had polling in this country showing the conservatives taking a lead over the labor party. so this isn't stirring the public. >> you were asking the questions when that intruder
because we have seen in great britain the flow of information as it relates to the success "news of the world" had in getting access to personal information of the prime minister, of great britain, of the royal family, of crime victims in great britain, that it creates a serious enough question to have our justice department find out what is true. if this is true, then it should be prosecuted under federal law here in the united states. if it's not we should know that and be able to move on. >> news international responded to these allegations, sir, and they're telling people that they have seen no evidence that these allegations in reference to phone hacking of 9/11 victims is true, and it's also important to note that news corp. is an american company, it's based in new york, rupert murdoch is australian by birth and is an american citizen and became one years back. in your estimation of what you know so far, do you think this could lead to any criminal charges from american prosecutors in the future? >> well it's too early to tell, but if the allegations end up being proven tr
in for "good morning america." they'll report on britain's ban on cosmetic ads that promote an unhealthy image. we're always online at
that came to puerto rico. puerto rico was owned by britain, as they liked to do with their colonies, and efficient evidently the sailor came there and said palm trees, warm weather, and look at the girls. and he remained. that's the end of the second part. the third part is in response to the op ed piece that margaret mcpeek wrote in the chronicle and the letters, i don't know if you've read them -- you should pick up -- the letters that a couple of, you know, irish americans wrote in response accusing cousin mcpeek of not having a sense of humor. it has to do with these tee shirts that target has produced for the st. patrick's day parade in which mrs. mcpeek derided the fact that they were making fun of the irish in the united states, you know, things like i survived the kelly murphy family gathering, things like that. and they wrote letters poking fun at what i thought was a couragous op ed piece. so this is in response to the irish americans who don't feel the pride that they should. and please excuse if i manhandle the irish manner of speaking. this is a joke told to me by one
. thanks for watching abc news. we hope you tune in for "good morning america." they'll report on britain's s n on cosmetics ads featuring models that are judged to be too photographically enhanced and promoting an unhealthy i
at something this, is a lancome makeup ad featuring julia roberts. looks good. it's been ban in great britain along with christie turling ton because the images were overly air brushed. fair or unfair. talk about that coming up. >>> let's begin on thursday morning with the time ticking away to reach a deal for the debt ceiling. kelli o'donnell is our capitol hill correspondent. good morning to you. >> good morning to you. this is a test of john boehner's leadership. he delivered a blunt message to his own members to get in line. he believes that was more credibility, that was their word, with some of the most conservative members when they retooled their proposal to raise the debt limit and cut spending by going deeper with the cut. and now, after so much talk, that vote comes today. >> reporter: the politics of grid lock hurtles. >> i've had kidney stones that are easier to pass than this. >> reporter: and the prognosis from democrats is dire. >> the speaker's plan is on life support and it's time for him to pull the plug. >> reporter: john boehner claims his debt limit plan has been revised
abuse. meanwhile, winehouse's best known album has shot to the top of the charts in great britain. >>> when we come back here tonight, after days of brutal heat, could the weather finally be taking a turn? >>> it was a little cooler today, a little, along the east coast, but what a week it has been. the heat dome that enveloped much of the country grew out of the midwest and slowly moved east, breaking more than 800 temperature records along the way. we're joined now by the weather channel's stephanie moore. what's it look like in the days ahead, stephanie? >> looks like we're going to see that heat start to break a little bit, lester. in fact, we're already starting to see that happen across parts of the northeast. thank goodness, we'll take every break we can get. you know, in dallas-ft. worth, we have had some 23 straight days of 100 or better. since july 1st, we've been in the upper 90s. in raleigh durham five straight day of temperatures above 100 degrees. that's a new record for them. we're now down to 90 in raleigh/durham. due to thunderstorms in the area. dallas is still r
on him in 2009. >>> 10 members of britain's royal family and their staff are among the thousands allegedly hacked by journalists at the now closed news of the world newspaper. there is growing pressure from news corps shareholders here in the u.s. they are filing suit against the parent company of fox 5 news. the white house has been going after companies that pay bribes forgetting foreign contracts. >>> now to attacks on the u.s. embassy in sierran grey mobs ransacked the embassy, they tore letters off the front of the building and spray painted messages like the american ambassador is a dog following visits by the u.s. ambassador last week. hillary clinton said the president officiary has lost legitimacy. >> he is not indy penceable we have absolute -- indespencable we have nothing invested in him remaining in power our will is to see the people's will occurs. >> u.s. is demanding compensation for the damage the french embassy was also attacked yesterday. >> some 2,000 people reportedly died at the hands of the syrian army since protests started earlier this year. for more on t
today. and now britain's prime minister calling an emergency session of parliament to address the controversy. several news corps executives are set to testify tomorrow before parliament including murdoch and his son, the deputy chief operating officer. it comes after allegations that news of the world employees hacked into the voice mail of a teenage murder victim. the news corps shut down the paper for good amid more damaging accusations that staffers were snooping on people including politicians and members of the royal family. since the scandal broke the shares on the stock market have falling 17 percent, and they are off 4.4 percent today alone. the chief fox correspondent has the news from new york. jonathan? >>jonathan: for the moment the focus of the scandal has moved from news corporation executives to other influential figures in law enforcement and politics. the firestorm engulfing two of britain's top cops and still threatening even the prime minister, david cameron. he cut short a trip to africa and is headed back to london tomorrow amid calls from the labor party
in the united states when they subpoena people, it's similar in great britain. parliament has issued the equivalent of subpoena to her, and to rupert murdoch and his son. they've all agreed they're going to testify. what's the implication of that? >> well, she's a british citizen, so she has to get there, go there, and she has to testify. she's said she would appear in front of that parliamentary committee. she's going to answer tough questions, what did she know, when did she know it and does she personally bear any responsibility for what happened. she was editor at the time when a teenager was new murdered ands of the world was deleting voicemail messages that for a brief time allowed her parents to believe she was alive. that's really what set this whole thing off. this woman was editor at the time. she's got tough questions to answer, but this whole scandal is by no means over, both in this country and in the united states. it has rocked the relationship between the police, the media, the politicians, and it's uncovering some pretty dirty, uncomfortable messy stuff that's hangin
and a stiff upper lip. you've pretty much summed up the day in britain's parliament and rupert murdoch's phone hacking scandal. he and his son james and former news corp. executive rebekah brooks were grilled today. the elder murdoch apologizing but refusing to take the rap. >> do you feel that ultimately you are responsible for this whole fiasco? >> nope. >> you're not responsible? who is responsible? >> the people that i trusted to run it. and then maybe the people they trusted. >> no apology and no stepping down. >> have you considered resigning? >> >> no. >> why not? >> because i feel that people i trusted, not saying who, i don't know what level. have let me down. and i think they have behaved disgracefully and betrayed the company and me. and it's for them to pay. i think that frankly i'm the best person to clean this up. >> and speaking of cleaning up, the proceedings were interrupted briefly when a protestor deliver a shaving cream pie. take a look at this. keep your eye on the lower left-hand corner of your screen. it happens pretty quickly. >> oh! >> here it is quickly again in slow
tied to the tabloid phone hacking scandal in britain. lawmakers here at home in the u.s. are calling for their own investigation. we're going to have details on that. do you know how to secure your cell phone to prevent people from hacking it? we're going to run through four things you need to know to keep hackers at bay. >> also this morning, daniel radcliffe will be here, the star, of course of the wildly successful "harry potter" franchise and the final film is opening tomorrow. it has already set the record for advanced ticket sales and he'll be opening up about the series as it comes to an end and a personal issue that he struggled with. >>> we want to begin with the chilling confession from the alleged killer of an 8-year-old in new york city. jeff rossen has details on that. some of the details are disturbing, jeff. >> reporter: this sure are. good morning to you. this young boy, 8-year-old boy asked his parents over and over again, can i please walk home from summer camp all by himself. parents finally said yes. they rehearsed the route, only about seven blocks, chose a halfw
'll have more on that. first some live pictures to show you. david cameron, the prime minister of britain speaking now before the house of parliament. let's listen. looks like we have a little bit of an audio issue. first we'll go back. new abc -- nbc poll governor perry running third behind mitt romney and michelle bachmann. >> he's not at the clard. jim acosta is following this for us from austin, texas. good morning. >> reporter: good morning. aides to rick perry say the governor of texas should make a decision by the end of the summer as to whether or not he'll get in the presidential race. if he does jump in, his face may take center stage. for republicans dissatisfied with the field for 2012 it could be divine intervention at a press conference texas governor rick perry confirmed what he recently told an iowa newspaper that he's feeling called by his faith and his friends to run. >> there's a lot of different ways to be called. my mother may call me for dinner. >> there was no religious overtone. >> no. i don't get confused. i'm a man of faith. >> texas is where the game success pla
hacking scandal in britain. tabloid reporters are accused of targeting the royal flame and a former prime minister and there are questions about why a more thorough investigation was not done. cbs news correspondent elizabeth palmer is in london with more for us today. good morning, elizabeth. >> good morning, chris. well, specifically britain wants to know why the first investigation into the news of the world hacking was shut down after just two people were arrested. which now appears to have been just the tip of the iceberg. senior police officers are being grilled this morning by a government committee. in the hot seat the deputy head of london's police force, john yates, who in 2009 refused to reopen an investigation into the news of the world. a decision he now admits was wrong. >> i would have made different decisions. >> reporter: yesterday "the guardian" newspaper reported there was evidence "the news of the world" had tried to buy a confidential list of the royal familiar lip's phone numbers from some of the police officers detailed to protect them. and that police were selling
: this scandal is nothing less than an earthquake, sending tremors to the highest levels of power in britain. the people of this country shocked to learn that for the last 30 years, murdoch and his executives have been dictating policy to the politicians and the police. the murdochs certainly had the ear of britain's prime minister. in 15 months, david cameron has had 26 meetings with murdoch executives. more than twice the number of meetings he's had with any other news organization. how powerful was rupert murdoch here in britain? >> immensely powerful. the view of every prime minister for r e last 30 years is that no one can get elected without the blessing of the patriarch. >> reporter: it is now not clear that either murdoch can survive this crisis. news corporation shares have tumbled. if the company faces criminal charges, it could be forced to unload some of its most lucrative holdings in the u.s. including fox tv.ç this really is a dynasty on the brink. jeffrey kofman, abc news, london. >> what a drama. and kind of an ironic twist. some of the paper's websites w
. >>> and from britain, word that pop singer amy winehouse according to published reports there, was found dead in her apartment in london. no word yet on the cause of her death. her struggles with drug and alcohol abuse and mental health issues often made headlines and were the premise of her hit song "rehab." the grammy award-winning singer was just 27. >>> back in this country, u.s. house speaker john boehner says he will try to reach a debt deal with lawmakers instead of with president barack obama. boehner ended talks with the white house yesterday over tax hikes which republicans are refusing to consider in any deficit reduction plan. he and other congressional leaders then met with the president at the white house this morning. we'll have more on those talks in a live report straight ahead. >>> about 4,000 faa workers could be furloughed today. congress adjourned last night without reauthorizing funding for the agency. essential staff like air traffic controllers will remain on the job, but faa engineers and construction workers are among those facing furloughs. the government will also
for the top selling but troubled tabloid. it's on the front page of every paper in britain. the paper will shutdown on sunday. a controversy over a phone hacking scandal. it's accused of hacking into cell phones of thousands of people ranging from people in iraq and afghanistan to the 2005 bombings as well as the royal family. the former editor has been arrested in connection with the scandal. he's the former communications chief for prime minister david cameron. he called for new regulations of the press. >>> paris prosecutors opening a preliminary investigation into sexual assault accusations against dominique strauss-kahn. there's a complaint he raped a woman in 2003. it will take months, if not years and may result in a trial. different sex assault charges in new york city after a hotel maid claims he attacked her in may. the questions about the accusers credibility punched holes in the case there. strauss-kahn was released and they have asked the d.a. to dismiss the case. >>> a government shutdown putting thousands out of work in minnesota is costing the state millions of dollars
you think about the future of this country's energy policy. but we begin with britain's tabloid scandal, and an unprecedented day for the owner at the center of it. rupert murdoch faces questioning by british lawmakers, who want to know more about cell phone hacking, police payoffs, and other alleged wrongdoing by reporters at his newspapers. cbs news correspondent elizabeth palmer is in london outside the house of parliament with the latest. good morning, liz. >> good morning. the murdochs are going to appear in about 2 1/2 hours from now. technically, at a session of the commons committee on culture, media and sports. but i'll tell you, in atmosphere it's much more like a cross between ethics theater and an inquisition. the set for this drama, the splendor of britain's westminster parliament. the star of the show, media titan rupert murdoch who has everything to lose. as investors around the world will be hanging on his every word and gesture. he's a man used to giving orders, not answering questions. especially from politicians who, until very recently, held him in either aw
thank you and good-bye from britain's best-selling tabloid, the latest fallout from the phone hacking scandal on "morning joe." somewhere in america, there's a doctor who can peer into the future. there's a nurse who can access in an instant every patient's past. and because the whole hospital's working together, there's a family who can breathe easy, right now. somewhere in america, we've already answered some of the nation's toughest healthcare questions. and the over 60,000 people of siemens are ready to do it again. siemens. answers. >>> 47 past the hour. after weeks of controversy, resignations and arrests, britain's "news of the world" published its last issue on sunday. it comes as its rooival, "the mirror," claims today that a new york police officer asked for voice mails of 9/11 victims. stephanie gosk reports on the "news of the world's" demise and its final day. >> with the ink barely dry on the final edition of news of the world, 80-year-old media baron rupert murdoch traveled to the uk to do damage control. on display, his unqualified support of melissa brooks. smiles for
? >> britain is not in the euro and while i am prime minister, it will never be in the euro so we should not be involved in those internal arrangements. only eurozone countries were involved. only eurozone countries have been involved about further bailouts. it is right not to use the european financial stability mechanism for future support to greece. >> what discussions did he have about preparing for that the fault? in particular with the president who has said in the context of departure from the euro and the devolution of the monetary union, it does not have to be disorderly. >> what is causing disorder as instability in europe. it is the fact that cannot be changed. if greece can default. good money will be wasted failure of greece. why wasn't the prime minister your normal skeptical self and lead an orderly withdrawal? >> checks seem to be a it endangers species sincethey were in terminal decline. the council said there is no alternative. the council did not look too happy when they came before the treasury committee. >> it is a imperative as working to have a viable set of of tre
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 199 (some duplicates have been removed)